• 601 Renaissance Way, Suite B, Ridgeland, MS 39157
  • Call Us: 601-605-9914

FAQs

Sleep Study Questions

What is it?

CPAP - Sleep StudyDoctors call this study a polysomnogram. It charts your brain waves, heart beat, and breathing as you sleep. It also records your eye and leg movements as well as muscle tension. Sensors are placed on your head, face, chest and legs. They send tiny electrical signals to a computer. The signals show when you are asleep and awake during the night.

Who gets it?

A polysomnogram is often used in the following cases:

  • To look for sleep-related breathing disorders, such as sleep apnea
  • To set the correct levels of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in patients with sleep related breathing disorders
  • To go along with a daytime nap study to see if someone has narcolepsy
  • To look for behaviors during sleep that can be violent or could be harmful to the patient or others

Your doctor will want to order a polysomnogram if he or she thinks you have any of these problems. You might also have a sleep study if you are already being treated for a sleep disorder but you are not getting better. The sleep study can help your doctor see why the treatment is not working.

What happens when I have it?

The doctors at the sleep center will go out of their way to make you feel relaxed. You will be asked to come to the center in the evening. Some time will be given for you to make yourself at home in the bedroom. No other patients will be in the room with you.

You will not feel any pain during the polysomnogram.

The sensors are gently placed on your skin and connected to a computer. The wires are long enough to let you move around and turn over in bed. You will be asked to move your eyes, clench your teeth and move your legs. This will make sure that the sensors are working.

You are free to read or watch TV until your normal bedtime. Then the lights are turned out and it is time for you to try to fall asleep. A low-light video camera allows a technologist to see you from a nearby room. He or she will have to enter your room if a sensor comes loose. He or she will also have to detach the wires if you need to go to the bathroom during the night.

The polysomnogram is not a test that you can fail. Nearly everyone falls asleep during the study. Most people do not sleep as well as they do at home. This will not affect the results. In most cases, you do not need to sleep for a full eight hours to find the source of your problem.

In the morning you will test the sensors again, and then they will be removed. This will complete the study, and you will be free to go. You may be tired if you did not sleep well during the night. Otherwise, you can return to normal activities on the day after a sleep study.

Who reads it?

A technologist is the first one to look over the data from a sleep study. First, he or she will chart your sleep stages. Then, he or she will look for any events of abnormal breathing or leg movement. The results will be given to a doctor. The doctor will review the study to find out what kind of sleep problem you may have.

Many sleep centers are accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM). The AASM sets strict standards for centers to maintain. This is to make sure that patients with sleep disorders get the highest level of care. In these centers, the results of a sleep study are always reviewed by a board-certified sleep specialist.

How do I get the results?

It usually takes about two weeks to get the results of a sleep study. At times the doctor who takes a look at the study needs to get more information. He or she may talk to the technologist or to the doctor who sent you to the center. The doctor who ordered the study will discuss the results with you. If your primary care doctor ordered it, then the results are sent to him or her. If you met with a doctor in the sleep center, then he or she will tell you the results.

How to prepare for your sleep Study

How to Prepare for Your Polysomnogram (PSG)

You will receive information regarding the date, time, and location of your sleep study appointment. Depending on the results of the study, you may be required to stay the next day for additional sleep testing.

In preparation, please read the following instructions carefully.

  • Avoid napping the day of the study.
  • Avoid alcohol, caffeine, sedatives, and stimulants for 24 hours, unless otherwise directed by your physician.
  • Eat your regular evening meal before you arrive to the Sleep Disorders Center. Breakfast is provided to those patients required to stay for daytime testing. Notify us in advance of any special dietary needs.
  • On the day of the study, make sure that your hair is free of oil, hair spray, and other products.
  • Bring your regularly scheduled medications and plan to take them as you normally would unless your physician instructs otherwise.
  • Bring comfortable sleep attire (avoid silk). Shower facilities are provided.
  • Bring your sleep questionnaire and sleep log along with a list of your regular medications, including dose strength, and dosing schedule.
  • If you are using positive airway pressure therapy (CPAP/BILEVEL), bring your mask and headgear.
  • If you are under 18 years of age, a parent or guardian is required to stay with you in the Sleep Disorders Center for the entire duration of testing.
  • Notify us if you have a disability that requires special assistance. You may be required to have a caregiver present during testing.

In preparation, please read the following instructions carefully.

  • Eat normally the night before and the morning of the study.
  • Breakfast and lunch will be provided if you stayed overnight for the polysomnogram. If you are scheduled for the day study only; please eat a normal meal the night before and the morning before coming to your appointment. Please notify us in advance if you have any special dietary needs.
  • Wear comfortable clothing.
  • On the day of the study, make sure that your hair is free of oil, hair spray, and other products.
  • Bring your regularly scheduled medications and plan to take them as you normally would unless your physician instructs otherwise.
  • Bring reading materials or other activities to occupy free time.
  • Avoid naps, smoking and physical exertion on the day of the test.
  • If you are under 18 years of age, a parent or guardian is required to stay with you in the Sleep Disorders Center for the entire duration of testing.
  • Notify us if you have a disability that requires special assistance. You may be required to have a caregiver present during testing.
  • Avoid alcohol, sedatives, stimulants, and caffeinated beverages (coffee, tea and cola) for 24 hours before the study.

If you are unable to keep your appointment or if you have an upper respiratory infection causing significant nasal congestion, contact us at 601-605-9914 at least 48 hours to reschedule your appointment.

We hope the information in our website is helpful to you in getting to know about our practice.

Check out the various sections of our website and do not forget to call us to make an appointment.

Our Address

International Center Of Sleep Medicine

601 Renaissance Way, Suite B
Ridgeland, MS 39157

  601-605-9914

 601-605-9904

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Office Hours

Monday 8:00 AM 5:00 PM
Tuesday 8:00 AM 5:00 PM
Wednesday 8:00 AM 5:00 PM
Thursday 8:00 AM 5:00 PM
Friday 8:00 AM 5:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed

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